Fundraising and Career Counseling

Career CounselingFrequent readers of this blog know I am a big supporter of elevating career counseling centers within the ranks of the higher education pecking order.

So when Melissa Korn, a writer at The Wall Street Journal, reported about the marriage of fundraising offices with career counseling offices in several colleges and universities, I knew I would share this information with you.

Many schools folded their career centers into their development offices. Amherst College in Massachusetts, for example, changed the reporting structure a few months ago. Colgate University in Hamilton, New York; Williams College in Massachusetts and Scripps College in Claremont, California, will all make the change July 1st. Two years ago, the University of Chicago merged career services, admissions and enrollment management with the advancement office.

Students are assigned career counselors in the first year and admission counselors meet with potential employers as they travel around the country and the world for next year’s class. Alumni and fundraising staff have a wealth of information on graduates who may be able to provide internships or even jobs to graduates.

Combined budgets make for more robust career counseling outreach activities. Giving career centers a seat at the table is long overdue.

Whether you agree or not, parents and prospective college students are asking questions about a school’s career services before they apply. Keeping that function separate from the enrollment management and alumni and fundraising functions, seems obsolete given the economic realities not just in the United States but around the world.

Change comes slow in higher education and disruptive change even slower. Turf wars are inevitable and administrative silos exist on every college campus.

I hope one person reading this week’s blog has both the vision and determination to consider making career services an essential part of marketing, enrollment management and alumni and fundraising. Consider the synergy!

Primer on College Reference Guides

There is no shortage of very good college reference guides to help students and families work through college selection.

I am happy to recommend several – and most have online components to make your research even easier.

I encourage you to visit and study:

  • College Navigator. This site is sponsored by the Department of Education and contains a database of thousands of colleges and universities. The schools are listed by location, program and degree offerings.
  • The University of Texas at Austin  Web U.S. Higher Education. This site provides links to the home pages of four year colleges and universities throughout the U.S.
  • Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities ((AJCU).  This site is sponsored by Jesuit colleges and will give you information on all Jesuit schools.
  • Hillel International. This is the official site of Hillel, the Foundation for Jewish Campus Life.
  • Women’s Colleges. This site will give you information on women’s colleges in the U.S.
  • Black Excel. This site provides information for African American students
  • NCAA.  This website provides useful information for anyone interested in varsity athletics at schools who are members of the NCAA.
  • FAFSA.  This is the federal site for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).  If you are applying for need-based aid, you will need to visit this site.
  • FAFSA.  This site allows families to get estimates of their expected family contribution.
  • Fastweb.  This site provides information on scholarships as well as expected family contribution calculator.
  • Finaid.  This is a general purpose site with lots of information about financial aid.
  • Federal Student Aid.  This is a comprehensive government site with information in both English and Spanish.

Please take the time to review any and all of the information on these sites.  It can only help you narrow your choices and find the best school for you.

Some college behavior still protected by privacy

In these days when it seems nothing is private,  college students still have a right of privacy in some matters.

You should be aware of two federal laws which protect your privacy:

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health, Information, Portability, and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

  • FERPA laws prevent colleges and universities from releasing information about academic or disciplinary matters to anyone, including parents, without the consent of the student.
  • HIPAA prevents health care providers from releasing information to anyone, including parents, about a student’s health record.

Colleges and universities are allowed to give out public information that is available online.  Some schools will provide information, especially if drugs or alcohol are involved.  But each school has its own published set of rules and you and your parents should be aware of the guidelines before you enroll on campus.

Many parents are annoyed that even though they are paying the bill, they don’t have access to their child’s academic or health records.

It was at the graduation ceremony for my second daughter, when she received a number of academic awards, that my husband and I were first made aware of how smart she was and how successful her college career had been.  I was proud of her, of course, but I admit that I felt annoyed that up to that point, we had not received any formal notification from the school about her grades or progress.

These laws have as many supporters as they do detractors.  I guess I fall into the latter category.  But the laws are the laws.  I urge you and your parents to know what they are so you won’t be either surprised or disappointed.

College recruitment: from or to Asia?

Students from AsiaWithin 10 years, Asia will be the home to three of the world’s four largest economies and what that means for higher education is profound.

I’m not here to argue one way or another any kind of shift in international higher education migration away from Europe and the U.S. to Asia. But any college or university who recruits international students in Asia will be interested in the following trends:*

  • Singapore, Malaysia and South Korea are emerging as contenders in attracting international students from other Asian countries.
  • China plans to host 300,000 students by 2020.
  • According to IIE, in 2012, there were more foreign students in China than in Australia and Germany.
  • An increasing number of students from Korea are enrolling in Chinese colleges and universities.
  • Malaysian students are opting to study in Indonesia.
  • An increased number of students from the Middle East are enrolling in Malaysia  schools to study.
  • International student enrollment is increasing in the Philippines with students from South Korea, China, Taiwan and Iran.
  • Education Singapore is a newly-created agency charged with promoting and marketing education in Singapore to help meet the government’s target of enrolling over 1 million international students by 2015.
  • Japan has set a goal of hosting 3 million students by 2020.

*Source: Student Mobility and the Internationalization of Higher Education, Project Atlas.

Implications for Future Asian Recruitment

  • As Asian colleges and universities improve in rankings and services, students in the region are more likely to enroll in Asian schools.
  • Colleges and universities who are recruiting in Asia should consider developing international partnerships, as opposed to establishing branch campuses. Combined degree programs and carefully constructed articulation agreements are ways of strengthening ties with Asian schools.
  • Developing hybrid programs and online programs with schools in Asia is one way to continue enrolling students from the region.

If colleges and universities want to maintain current international student enrollment numbers the regions most fruitful may be the whole of Africa and the nation of Iran. 

How to Get a Job at Google

Maybe Google values skills you learn in college,  not necessarily the college degree itself.

I know anyone reading this blog knows Google but perhaps you may not have considered what is required to work for the tech giant.

In an article published on April 19, 2014,  New York Times writer Thomas Friedman shares some of his conversation with Mr. Laszlo Bock, who is in charge of all hiring at Google.  (They hire about 100 new people each week.)

Mr. Bock stresses the importance of creating value with what you know.  He cautions that having a college degree does not guarantee that you will have the skills or traits to do any job.

The first thing Google looks for in a new hire is general cognitive ability or the ability to learn new things and solve problems.  Having the ability to understand and apply information is essential.  A solid liberal arts education will help.

The New College GuideIn compiling your resume, Mr. Bock recommends framing your strengths by demonstrating that what you have accomplished will create value.  Be explicit about the thought process behind why you did something.

College is a huge investment of time and money and you should think long and hard about what you are getting in return. Make sure, Mr. Bock recommends, that you are learning the skills that will be valued in today’s workplace.

In my book, The New College Guide: How to Get In, Get Out & Get a Job, I talk about skills college students should develop in college and how to find colleges or universities that will help you develop those skills.