How to Get a Job at Google

Maybe Google values skills you learn in college,  not necessarily the college degree itself.

I know anyone reading this blog knows Google but perhaps you may not have considered what is required to work for the tech giant.

In an article published on April 19, 2014,  New York Times writer Thomas Friedman shares some of his conversation with Mr. Laszlo Bock, who is in charge of all hiring at Google.  (They hire about 100 new people each week.)

Mr. Bock stresses the importance of creating value with what you know.  He cautions that having a college degree does not guarantee that you will have the skills or traits to do any job.

The first thing Google looks for in a new hire is general cognitive ability or the ability to learn new things and solve problems.  Having the ability to understand and apply information is essential.  A solid liberal arts education will help.

The New College GuideIn compiling your resume, Mr. Bock recommends framing your strengths by demonstrating that what you have accomplished will create value.  Be explicit about the thought process behind why you did something.

College is a huge investment of time and money and you should think long and hard about what you are getting in return. Make sure, Mr. Bock recommends, that you are learning the skills that will be valued in today’s workplace.

In my book, The New College Guide: How to Get In, Get Out & Get a Job, I talk about skills college students should develop in college and how to find colleges or universities that will help you develop those skills.

The College Corporate Connection; or lack thereof

The college-corporate connection isn’t always a tight one, especially when it comes to views of employment following graduation.

A recent blog published by Intead outlined the differences between what college presidents think is important in getting a job after graduation and what employers believe is important.

Among the findings:

  • College presidents believe that a school’s reputation, a graduate’s internships, major, GPA, and employment during college were the most important factors.
  • Employers believe that internships, employment during college, college major, volunteer experiences and extracurricular activities were important when evaluating a potential employee.  College GPA and reputation came in last. 
  • Headlines stress how many college graduates are looking for jobs while living in their parents’ basements.  But that is only part of the story.  Employers have jobs that they cannot fill because college graduates do not have the necessary skills.
  • Increasingly corporations are partnering with colleges and universities to meet their future workforce needs to comprar cialis sin receta.  For example, IBM has created the Academic Initiative, and is working with colleges and universities to develop curricula that will help college graduates develop data skills needed to meet “Big Blue’s” future workforce needs.  Georgetown University, Northwestern University, the National University of Singapore and the University of Missouri are all participating schools.

The New College GuideThe New College Guide: How to Get In, Get Out and Get a Job recommends:

  • Meeting with staff in your school’s career counseling office to learn of any corporate partnerships.
  • Also get a list of all internships and off-site work opportunities.  
  • Be your own advocate and plot your own employment experience while in college.
  • You now know this is important to future employees.

Important College Enrollment Statistics You Want to Know

According to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, college enrollment has declined in the U.S. for the past two years.  

In 2011, total higher education enrollment was 20.5 million students. In 2012, the number was 19.9 million, a decline of almost 700,000 students.

Last year the decline in enrollment by region was:

  • -0.3% in the Northeast
  • -0.9% in the South
  • -.0 7% in the West
  • -2.6% in the Midwest

The college enrollment statistics are both bad news and good news.

What do these college enrollment figures mean for you?  

If you have on your list colleges and universities located in the Midwest, you may have a better chance of admission given the decline last year in that region of the country.

The New College GuideThe New College Guide: How to Get In, Get Out, and Get a Job recommends:

  • Contact the admission office for each of the schools on your list and ask to get the number of applicants, admitted and enrolled students for the past three years.
  • Also request the average SAT scores and GPAs for the entering class for the past three years.  Do not rely only on guide books. You will get only partial information.
  • Become your own investigator and dig deeper into a school’s enrollment picture.
  • You may be surprised at what you learn.

The college waiting list becoming a grim reality

Read The New College Guide: How to Get In, Get Out, and Get a Job and Never Find Yourself on a college waiting list.

The news was grim in the Boston Globe’s May 2 edition: The college waiting list has become a reality in today’s application process because more students are applying to more schools.

With students applying to so many schools, admission officers have a harder time estimating how many accepted students will enroll.

“Yield” rates can affect a school’s ranking in national publications and even its bond rating. Wait lists are one way to control both.

Last year, 17.7% of high school students applied to more than eight schools. The average percentage of students accepted off wait lists was 25%. At selective schools the percentage is much lower.

The New College GuideAnd even if you get off your first choice school’s wait list, your chances of receiving financial aid decrease. These are not great odds.

If you read and follow the guidelines of The New College Guide, you will never find yourself on a school’s wait list. You will have done all of the work before you apply to “match” your chances of admission with your college preferences. So read the first 42 questions in The New College Guide and forget about finding your name on a wait list.

 

The SAT is revised. Is it better? No.

Even with revisions, the SAT remains a seriously flawed – and therefore poor – indicator of college aptitude and qualification.

The first Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT,  was administered in June, 1926.  Students had 97 minutes to answer 315 questions.  For almost 90 years, the results of what most educational experts believe is a flawed test, have dominated admission applications and decisions.

Recently the College Board announced that it is altering the exam to include the following changes:

  • The mandatory essay has been eliminated.
  • A perfect score is 1600.
  • Changes in some sections of the advanced mathematics part of the exam have been eliminated. 
  • Obscure vocabulary words have been replaced.

Regardless of the suggested changes, the SAT remains a controversial exam. The poorest test takers score 400 points lower than richer students. The rich can pay for expensive test prep courses; the poor cannot.  Critics claim that this makes it relatively easy to game the system.

For too many years the most elite colleges and universities have used the exam to eliminate applicants with low SAT scores.  

  • Is there a connection between SAT scores and college rankings?
  • Has the exam become another “gatekeeper?”
  • How many college presidents and boards of trustees pressure enrollment management and admission deans to improve the average SAT scores of the next incoming class?
  • How many college presidents and boards of trustees examine, after one year, the grade point averages of the freshmen who entered with high SAT scores and those who did not?  
  • How many presidents and board of trustees examine the SAT scores of graduating seniors?

The New College GuideCritics of the exam, me included, believe that a better way to measure the academic competency of applicants is to examine their four year high school grades and progression. No one’s academic career should be judged by the results of one exam on one specific day.

The New College Guide: How to Get In, Get out, and Get a Job recommends: 

  • Investigate the hundreds of colleges and universities who are SAT-optional.